Posts Tagged 'grits'

Enjoyin grits in the “Grits belt”

Grits has always been a favorite dish in the south. There are many different variations of grits including the traditional grits with butter, grits with cheese, and shrimp and grits just to name a few.   I prefer grits mixed lots and lots of butter with pepper sprinkled on top.  I also like grits with breakfast casserole mixed in with cheese sausage and eggs.  This morning I enjoyed a rather large bowl of grits mixed in with just enough butter to change the color.

Movie Name: My Cousin Vinny (1992)
Quote:

Vinny Gambini: [Vinny and Lisa receive their breakfast orders, Vinny
  looks at his skeptically] Whats this over here?
Grits Cook: You never heard of grits?
Vinny Gambini: Sure Ive heard of grits. I just never actually *seen*
  a grit before.

 

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Grits have their origins in Native American corn preparation. Traditionally, the corn for grits was ground by a stone mill. The results are passed through screens, with the finer siftings being grit meal, and the coarser being grits. Many communities in the United States used a gristmill until the mid-20th century, with families bringing their own corn to be ground, and the miller retaining a portion of the corn for his fee. In South Carolina, state law requires grits and corn meal to be enriched, similar to the requirements for flour, unless the grits are ground from corn from which the miller keeps part of the product for his fee.

Three-quarters of grits sold in the U.S. are sold in the South stretching from Texas to Virginia, also known as the “grits belt”. The state of Georgia declared grits its official prepared food in 2002. Similar bills have been introduced in South Carolina, with one declaring:

Whereas, throughout its history, the South has relished its grits, making them a symbol of its diet, its customs, its humor, and its hospitality, and whereas, every community in the State of South Carolina used to be the site of a grits mill and every local economy in the State used to be dependent on its product; and whereas, grits has been a part of the life of every South Carolinian of whatever race, background, gender, and income; and whereas, grits could very well play a vital role in the future of not only this State, but also the world, if as Charleston’s The Post and Courier proclaimed in 1952, “An inexpensive, simple, and thoroughly digestible food, [grits] should be made popular throughout the world. Given enough of it, the inhabitants of planet Earth would have nothing to fight about. A man full of [grits] is a man of peace.

Grits are usually either yellow or white, depending on the color of corn. Most commonly found are “quick” grits in which the germ and hull have been removed. Whole kernel grits are sometimes called “Speckled.” Grits are prepared by simply boiling the ground kernels into a porridge until enough water is absorbed or vaporized to leave it semi-solid.

Breakfast or sleep? It’s not easy for me to be health conscious.

Breakfast is the first meal of the day, usually consumed in the morning.  The word is a compound of “break” and “fast”, referring to the conclusion of fasting since the previous day’s last meal.  Breakfast meals vary widely in different cultures around the world, but often include a carbohydrate such as cereal or rice, fruit and/or vegetable, protein, sometimes dairy, and beverage.  Breakfast buffets and new fast food breakfast items are very popular in the U.S.

I am not a morning person and breakfast is probably the most skipped meal of the day for me.  When I get the opportunity to have a good breakfast I usually do not pass. I have expressed my love for pancakes in a previous blog, but I also enjoy many other breakfast items.  Until my mid 30′s I would have a large bowl of some of the sweetest cereals that i could find.  Crunch Berries was on the top of the list.  One day, I decided that I preferred the extra sleep over the morning bowl of sugar filled cereal.  I actually lost weight and saved money on groceries. Upon further research of this topic, I have found that skipping the first meal may not be the healthiest thing to do.

Breakfast from Burgess B&B

Studies show that children who eat breakfast do better in school.  It doesn’t take much further thought to realize adults will feel better and perform better at work as well.  Whether you work at home, on the farm, at the office, at school, or on the road, it is not a good idea to skip breakfast.  Eating a good breakfast sets the tone for the rest of the day.

Most people give a variety of reasons for not eating breakfast. A common reason is that they are not hungry in the morning, which is a result of eating a full meal late in the evening or late snacking. When they go to bed, the body is still busy digesting all that food. Digestion then goes into a slower gear during the hours of sleep and there is still food in the stomach in the morning. The stomach needs a rest too. A tired stomach does not feel like digesting a big breakfast. When you get up in the morning, your glucose or blood sugar level is at its lowest point in the day. Glucose is the basic fuel for the brain and central nervous system. A good breakfast will keep you from being tired and irritable by mid-morning.

Maybe I can, one day, take this advice and wake up an extra 30 minutes to participate in the most important meal of the day.  Until then, I feel pretty good knowing that I had that extra time in bed.

Source – Wikipedia, About.com, beyondthebend.com